Constituents of effective and sustainable implementation of school level inclusive education in Zimbabwe

Authors

  • Patrick Sibanda Department of Disability Studies and Special Needs Education, Faculty of Applied Social Sciences, Zimbabwe Open University, Zimbabwe.

Abstract

This article reviews the constituents of effective and sustainable implementation of school level inclusive education with reference to Zimbabwe. Implementation of inclusive education is a collaborative concern involving multiple stakeholders who include teachers, school administrators, government, parents, counsellors, psychologists, therapists and social welfare officers among others. It comes at a cost, hitherto less expensive than continuing with exclusive arrangements. The constituents of effective and sustainable implementation of inclusive education include reviewing and reflecting on current practices; setting up the Inclusive Education Leadership Team; development of an action plan for change; principles for implementation; implementation parameters; and monitoring and evaluation. From thorough examination of these constituents, the article concludes that effective and sustainable implementation of inclusive education depends on strategic action planning, commitment, collaborative effort and continuous monitoring and evaluation. Consequently, the article implores the government of Zimbabwe to intensify training and development of teachers, increase resource allocation towards the implementation of inclusive education and to review teacher deployment patterns and enforce policies that support effective and sustainable implementation of school level inclusive education.

References

DfES, 2004. Removing barriers to achievement: The government strategy for SEN. Nottingham: DfES.

Friend, M., 2005. Special education: contemporary perspectives for school professionals. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Friend, M., Cook, L., Hurley-Chamberlain, D., Shamberger, C., 2010. Co-teaching: An illustration of the complexity of collaboration in special education. J. Educ. Psychol. Consult., 20(1), 9-27.

Kilgore, K., 2011. Inclusive practices implementation matrix. Louisiana: The SUN Center.

Kilgore, K., 2013. 10 steps to implementing effective inclusive practices: A guide for school site leaders. Louisiana: The SUN Center.

Louisiana Department of Education, 2011. Validated inclusive practices. http://www.laspdg.org/files/Vailidate Practices.pdf

Mafa, O., 2012. Challenges of implementing inclusion in Zimbabwe's education system. Online J. Educ., 1(2), 14-22.

O’Gorman, E., Drudy, S., 2011. Professional development for teachers working in the area of special education/inclusion in mainstream schools: The views of teachers and other stakeholders. Dublin: National Council for Education.

Schuelka, M., 2018. Implementing inclusive education. London: K4D HelpDesk.

Sibanda, P., 2017. Inclusion awareness among rural mainstream teachers in Zimbabwe. Sci. J. Pure Appl. Soc. Sci., 6(7), 581-588.

Sibanda, P., 2018. The dynamics of the cost and funding inclusive education in developing countries. Sci. J. Pure Appl. Soc. Sci., 7(9), 816-822.

Villa, R.A., Thousand, J.S., 2003. Making inclusive education work. Teach. All Stud., 61(2), 19-23.

Wilson, C.H., Ellerbe, K.L., Christian, S.H., 2011. Best practices of inclusion at the elementary level. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/Ed522452.pdf

World Bank, 2013. Inclusion matters: The foundation of shared prosperity. Washington D.C: World Bank.

Wright, B.J., 2015. How inclusion is defined and implemented in elementary classrooms. Honours Programme. Theses, 203. https://scholarworks.uni.edu/hpt/203

Published

2020-11-18

How to Cite

Sibanda, P. (2020). Constituents of effective and sustainable implementation of school level inclusive education in Zimbabwe. Scientific Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences, 9(11), 975-983. Retrieved from http://www.sjournals.com/index.php/sjpas/article/view/1611

Issue

Section

Social Sciences

Most read articles by the same author(s)

<< < 1 2 3