Evaluation of supplemented ginger (Zingiber officinale) levels on the performance of growing and fattening Uda sheep in semi-arid Nigeria

Authors

  • Nasiru Muhammad Department of Animal Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University (UDUS), Sokoto, Nigeria
  • H.M. Tukur Department of Animal Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University (UDUS), Sokoto, Nigeria
  • S.A. Magandi Department of Animal Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University (UDUS), Sokoto, Nigeria
  • H.I. Abdulqadir Department of Animal Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University (UDUS), Sokoto, Nigeria
  • U. Ifesinachi Department of Animal Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University (UDUS), Sokoto, Nigeria
  • M. Abubakar Department of Animal Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University (UDUS), Sokoto, Nigeria
  • C.U. Ezimuo Department of Animal Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University (UDUS), Sokoto, Nigeria
  • M.G. Garba Department of Animal Production and Health Federal University, Dutsin-Ma (FUDMA), Katsina state, Nigeria
  • L.A. Saulawa Department of Animal Production and Health Federal University, Dutsin-Ma (FUDMA), Katsina state, Nigeria
  • A. Yusuf Department of Animal Production and Health Federal University, Dutsin-Ma (FUDMA), Katsina state, Nigeria

Keywords:

Supplementation, Ginger, Uda sheep, Semi-arid, Nigeria

Abstract

Two different experiments were conducted using fifteen growing lambs and fifteen fattening rams of Uda breedwith average weight of 17 and 21.4 kg and age of between 11and 20 months respectively to evaluate supplemented ginger levels on performance of the animals. In each experiment, the animals were randomly assigned to three treatment diets containing graded ginger levels in a completely randomized experimental design replicated five times. Ginger was supplemented at graded levels of 2.5 and 5% for treatments T2 and T3 respectively, while treatment T1 (control) had no ginger. Results indicated a significantly lower body weight gain for growing animals (experiment 1) fed diets containing ginger (P<0.05) while feed conversion ratio (FCR) and cost of feed/kg live weight gain was higher. For fattening animals (experiment 2), ginger inclusion above 2.5% had a negative effect on fattening performance (P<0.05). It was concluded that inclusion of ginger in the diet of growing and fattening Uda sheep could not improve performance.

References

A.O.A.C., 1990. Association of official analytical chemist. Official method of analysis (15thed). 1.A.O.A.C, Arlington, Virginia.

Akhtar, M.S., Afzal, H., Chaudry, Y., 1984. Preliminary in vitro antibacterial screening of Bakain, and Zarisk against Salmonella. Medicose., 9, 6-7.

Akoachere, J.F., Ndip, R.N., Chenwi, E.B., 2000. Antibacterial effect of Zingiber officinale and Garcinia kola on respiratory tract pathogens. East. Afr. Med. J., 97.11, 588-92.

Anon, 2009. About Sokoto State Government. http://www.sokotostate.gov.ng/aboutsokoto

Anon, J., 1980. Guide to the care and use of experimental animal. Canadian Council on Animal on Animal Care, Ottawa, Onterio Canada. 1, 85-90.

ARC, 1990. The nutrient requirement of ruminant livestock. Technical review by an agriculture research council working party CAB International, Walligton, Oxon. 249.

Bakirel, T., Bakirel, U., Keles, O.Ü., Ülgen, S.G., Yardibi, H., 2008. In vivo assessment of antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of rosemary (Rosmarinusofficinalis) in alloxan-diabetic rabbits. J. Ethnopharmacol., 116, 64–73.

Banchaar, C., Calsamiglia, S., Chaves, A.V., Fraser, G.R., Colombatto, D., McAllister, T.A., Beauchemin, K.A., 2008. A review of plant-derived essential oils in ruminant nutrition and production.Anim. Feed. Sci. Technol., 145, 209-228.

Barton, M.D., 1999. The down-side of antibiotic use in pig production: The effect of antibiotic resistance of enteric bacteria. In Manipulating Pig Production; Carnwell, P.D., Ed.; Australasian Pig Science Association: Victoria, Australia. 7, 41-42.

Bibi-Farouk, F., Osinowo, A.O., 2006. Feed intake and weight gain of Yankasa ewes fed fresh Ficusthoningii Leaves In: (Muhammad, I.R., B.F. Muhammad., F. Bibi-farouk and Y. Shehueds) Application of Appropriate Technology in Over Coming Environmental Barriers in Animal Agriculture in Nigeria.Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of Nigeria Society for Animal Production 12-15 March. 413-416.

Cowan, M.M., 1999. Plant products as antimicrobial agents. Clin. Microbiol. Rev., 12, 564-582.

Gatenby, R.M., 2002. Sheep: The tropical agriculture (Sec. Revis). CTA Macmillan, London.

Greathead, H., 2003. Plant and plant extract for improving animal productivity. Proc. Nutr. Soc., 62, 279-290.

HHH, 2011. Herbs hands healing. Traditional western herbal product. Ginger extracts from in a Nutshell Ginger by Jill Rosemary Davies. Herbs Hands Healing Ltd. http://www.herbs-hands-healing.co.(5.20.2015)

Honhold, N., Petit, H., Halliwell, R.W., 1989. Condition scoring scheme for small east African goats in Zimbabwe. French embassy goat project. Harare Zimbabwe. 44-48.

Maigandi, S.A., Nasiru, A., 2006. Replacement value of Faidherbiaalbida pods (FAD) fed to Uda sheep in semiarid zone in: Application of appropriate technology in Nigeria (Muhammad I.R., B.F Muhammad, F. bibi- Farouk and Y. Shehueds). Proceeding of 13th annual conference of Nigeria society of animal production 12-13 March. 439-443.

Maigandi, S.A., Tukur, H.M., Deneji, A.I., 2002. Fore–stomach digesta in diet of growing sheep. Performance and economics of production. Sokoto J. Vet. Sci., 2, 16-21.

Mamman, A.B., Oyebanji, J.O., Peters, S.W., 2000. Nigeria: A people United a Future Assured (survey of states). Gabinmo publishing Co. Ltd. Calabar, Nigeria. 2, 4-6.

Muhammad, D.S., Junaidu, A.U., Oboegbule, S.I., Egwu, G.O., Mogaji, A.A., Lawal, M., Hassan, Y., 2009. Isolation and prevalence of Campylobacter species in Sokoto State, Nigeria. Sokoto J. Vet. Sci., 4, 501- 505.

Muhammad, N., Maigandi, S.A., Hassan, W.A., Daneji, A.I., 2008. Growth performance and economics of sheep production with varying levels of rice milling waste. Sokoto J. Vet. Sci., 7(1), 59-64. (ISSN 1595093X).

Nidaullah, H., Durrani, F.R., Ahmad, S., Jan, I.U., Gul, S., 2010. Aqueous extract from different medicinal plantssubjects eating self selecting diets. Am. J. Clin. Nutr., 40, 1338-1344.

NPC, 2006. National Population Commission (2006). Census estimates. Retrieved from www.population.gov.ng

Payne, W.J., Wilson, R.T., 1999. An introduction to animal husbandry in the tropics ( 5th edition). Cambridge university press, London. 446.

Pervez, A., 1992. Response of broiler chicks to different feed additives. M.Sc. Thesis NWFP Agricultural University . Pashawar, Pakistan. 44-49.

Sarica, S., Ciftci, A., Demir, F., Kilinc, K., Yildrim, Y., 1995. Use of antibiotic growth promoter and two herbal natural feed additives with and without exogenous enzymes in wheat based ruminants diets. South Afr. J. Anim. Sci., 35, 61-72.

SAS, 2005. Statview statistical package. Statistical Analysis System, Institute Inc. User Guide. Carry, North Carolina U.S.A.

SEPP, 1996. Sokoto environmental protection program. Meteorological data. Unpublished.

Waghorm, G.C., Jones, W.T., Shelton, I.D., Mcnabb, W.C., 1990. Considered tannins and the nutritive value of herbage. Proceedings of the new Zeeland Grassland Association. 51, 171-176.

Wallace, R.J., McEwan, N.R., McIntosh, F.M., Teferedegne, B., Newbold, C.J., 2002. Natural products as manipulators of rumen fermentation. Asia-Aus. J. Anim. Sci., 10, 1458-1468.

Windisch, W., Rohrer, E., Schedle, K., 2009. Phytogenic feed additives to young piglets and poultry: Mechanisms and application. In: Phytogenics in animal nutrition: Natural concepts to optimize gut health and performance; Steiner, T., Ed.; Nottingham University Press: Nottingham, UK. 19–22.

Windisch, W., Schedle, K., Plitzner, C., Kroismayer, A., 2008. Use of phytogenetic products as feed additives for swine and poultry. J. Anim. Sci., 86, 140-148.

Published

2016-06-25

How to Cite

Nasiru Muhammad, H.M. Tukur, S.A. Magandi, H.I. Abdulqadir, U. Ifesinachi, M. Abubakar, C.U. Ezimuo, M.G. Garba, L.A. Saulawa, & A. Yusuf. (2016). Evaluation of supplemented ginger (Zingiber officinale) levels on the performance of growing and fattening Uda sheep in semi-arid Nigeria. Scientific Journal of Animal Science, 5(6), 306-313. Retrieved from https://www.sjournals.com/index.php/sjas/article/view/191

Issue

Section

Original Article

Most read articles by the same author(s)

Similar Articles

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.